CodeWeavers Blogs

Announcing a first Alpha build of CrossOver 19 for macOS Catalina

Hi folks, As you are probably aware, we have been working hard to provide support for 32 bit applications on macOS 10.15, Catalina.  This has proven to be a monumental challenge, as we are effectively adding back a facility that Apple has taken away. I am happy to announce that we have finished a first alpha build of CrossOver 19 for macOS 10.15.  This build is intended for customers that have upgraded to Catalina only to find themselves unable to run their favorite Windows applications with CrossOver.  Our hope is that this build will get those customers back up and running. If you are a customer that is running Catalina and you have an existing CrossOver install, please contact us to ask for access to this build.…

Quick Catalina Update — October 25, 2019

25 October 2019  
by Jeremy WhiteJeremy White
Hi folks, We are overdue for an update on our support for 32 bit applications on Catalina.  All of the key developers are heads down, working on that support, so I thought I'd write a quick summary. Today for the first time we took a build from the developers and gave it to QA.  And I'm thrilled to report that this build is showing real progress; we ran a few applications including Notepad++, Steam, and a few games.  This is very exciting forward progress for us, and shows that we are beginning to integrate all of the hard work of the team over this past year. However, a lot of applications are still not working; a wide range of our titles fail (Quicken, Office, and others).  Right now, those failures center around…

CrossOver for Catalina Progress — October 3, 2019

In the last month we've continued to make steady progress in our quest to run 32-bit Windows programs in a 64-bit Mac process, so they can work on macOS Catalina (10.15). As previously described in an earlier blog post , Catalina doesn't support running 32-bit processes, which is what we've always used in the past for running 32-bit Windows programs. In our last post, we reported that we had gotten Wine's built-in Notepad running. That was a nice milestone, but it's a very simple app. Since then, we've gotten more apps to run, including some third-party apps of increasing complexity. The highlights are: * Notepad++ * Some simple OpenGL test applications and, just today: * Steam! * and, via Steam, Plants vs. Zombies Not only did Steam run PvZ,…

Linux For Everyone Podcast Debut

Guess what!?!? Last week Jeremy White, the CEO of CodeWeavers and Andrew Eikum, a Wine Developer at CodeWeavers who focuses the majority of his work time on Proton joined Forbes’s Jason Evangelho on his Podcast, Linux For Everyone. The PodcastLinux for Everyone is a podcast about the thrilling world of desktop Linux, open source software and the community creating it. For beginners and veterans alike! Hosted by Forbes's Jason Evangelho. The EpisodeJeremy and Andrew discuss the history of Wine, the history of CodeWeavers and how our collaboration with Valve on Proton started. And that’s not all, folks. There’s more, but you’ll have to listen to the podcast (thanks marketing). Perhaps we discuss what we’re working on now, or our hopes and…

So We Don't Have a Solution for Catalina...Yet

We just finished stuffing our mouths with tacos (Tuesday + Apple Event = Taco Tuesday Event at CodeWeavers) as we watched in anticipation the Apple Event 2019. Our fingers were crossed while clenching our good luck charm(s) of choice (four leaf clovers, horseshoe charms, fuzzy dice, rabbit foot keychains and dreamcatchers) hoping that there would be a clue as to when Catalina, the latest macOS would be released. We got nothing. Except an update to their website after the Apple Event mentioning a vague  October release. Welp. At least that buys us a little bit more time than say any Tuesday in September. So no, we don’t have anything for Catalina yet, but we do have is an explanation of the technical curveballs we’ve been thrown, the…

A Tragic Loss

8 September 2019
by Jeremy WhiteJeremy White
This past month, we here at CodeWeavers and the wider Wine community suffered a devastating loss.  Our friend and colleague, Józef Kucia, died at the age of 30. Józef first contributed to Wine in March of 2012, showing remarkable skill with Wine’s D3D technology.  He became a key contributor to Wine, submitting over 2,500 patches. He also contributed to other open source projects including Mesa and Debian.  Józef founded and led the vkd3d project and provided insight and guidance to the Vulkan working group. Józef joined CodeWeavers in 2015, and quickly became one of our most valued employees. While technically brilliant, Józef was a man of few words. He carried a quiet kindness, but it could be difficult to draw him out. …

What's in A Name

22 August 2019  
by Ethan LeeEthan Lee
What's in A Name Sharing code between projects is great! It's nice when you can take portions of your software and divide them up in a way that makes useful pieces reusable in new projects, while also making it easy to update and maintain older software that you're no longer actively looking at. Shared Objects, known as DLLs on Windows, are just really nice. As long as you know what you're sharing, of course. Like a friend who has never known the words "social boundaries", sometimes things get shared a little too much. Versions get mixed up, things don't line up, the thing you thought you were using wasn't what you're actually using, the list goes on. In short, DLL Hell is pretty hot. But even Hell has rules! Every operating system…

From Problem to Resolution: The Journey of a Bug

21 August 2019  
by Anna LaskyAnna Lasky
From Problem to Resolution: The Journey of a Bug As the Proton QA for CodeWeavers, I have seen quite a few bugs.  In fact, practically every bug that has been fixed since Proton was released a year ago, including those listed specifically in the changelog and many more, has been tested by me.   Sometimes there is a bug that is so fun to watch or to reproduce that I almost can't stop.   One such bug was a mouse bug that affected every Unity title (or at least every one I tested!).  The behavior:  a) Moving your physical mouse upward causes the game camera to move downwards and to the right.   b) Clicking the mouse causes the camera to shift 1 pixel down and 1 pixel right.  I took this…

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