CodeWeavers Blogs

Linux For Everyone Podcast Debut

Guess what!?!? Last week Jeremy White, the CEO of CodeWeavers and Andrew Eikum, a Wine Developer at CodeWeavers who focuses the majority of his work time on Proton joined Forbes’s Jason Evangelho on his Podcast, Linux For Everyone. The PodcastLinux for Everyone is a podcast about the thrilling world of desktop Linux, open source software and the community creating it. For beginners and veterans alike! Hosted by Forbes's Jason Evangelho. The EpisodeJeremy and Andrew discuss the history of Wine, the history of CodeWeavers and how our collaboration with Valve on Proton started. And that’s not all, folks. There’s more, but you’ll have to listen to the podcast (thanks marketing). Perhaps we discuss what we’re working on now, or our hopes and…

So We Don't Have a Solution for Catalina...Yet

We just finished stuffing our mouths with tacos (Tuesday + Apple Event = Taco Tuesday Event at CodeWeavers) as we watched in anticipation the Apple Event 2019. Our fingers were crossed while clenching our good luck charm(s) of choice (four leaf clovers, horseshoe charms, fuzzy dice, rabbit foot keychains and dreamcatchers) hoping that there would be a clue as to when Catalina, the latest macOS would be released. We got nothing. Except an update to their website after the Apple Event mentioning a vague  October release. Welp. At least that buys us a little bit more time than say any Tuesday in September. So no, we don’t have anything for Catalina yet, but we do have is an explanation of the technical curveballs we’ve been thrown, the…

A Tragic Loss

8 September 2019
by Jeremy WhiteJeremy White
This past month, we here at CodeWeavers and the wider Wine community suffered a devastating loss.  Our friend and colleague, Józef Kucia, died at the age of 30. Józef first contributed to Wine in March of 2012, showing remarkable skill with Wine’s D3D technology.  He became a key contributor to Wine, submitting over 2,500 patches. He also contributed to other open source projects including Mesa and Debian.  Józef founded and led the vkd3d project and provided insight and guidance to the Vulkan working group. Józef joined CodeWeavers in 2015, and quickly became one of our most valued employees. While technically brilliant, Józef was a man of few words. He carried a quiet kindness, but it could be difficult to draw him out. …

What's in A Name

22 August 2019  
by Ethan LeeEthan Lee
What's in A Name Sharing code between projects is great! It's nice when you can take portions of your software and divide them up in a way that makes useful pieces reusable in new projects, while also making it easy to update and maintain older software that you're no longer actively looking at. Shared Objects, known as DLLs on Windows, are just really nice. As long as you know what you're sharing, of course. Like a friend who has never known the words "social boundaries", sometimes things get shared a little too much. Versions get mixed up, things don't line up, the thing you thought you were using wasn't what you're actually using, the list goes on. In short, DLL Hell is pretty hot. But even Hell has rules! Every operating system…

From Problem to Resolution: The Journey of a Bug

21 August 2019  
by Anna LaskyAnna Lasky
From Problem to Resolution: The Journey of a Bug As the Proton QA for CodeWeavers, I have seen quite a few bugs.  In fact, practically every bug that has been fixed since Proton was released a year ago, including those listed specifically in the changelog and many more, has been tested by me.   Sometimes there is a bug that is so fun to watch or to reproduce that I almost can't stop.   One such bug was a mouse bug that affected every Unity title (or at least every one I tested!).  The behavior:  a) Moving your physical mouse upward causes the game camera to move downwards and to the right.   b) Clicking the mouse causes the camera to shift 1 pixel down and 1 pixel right.  I took this…

A year since Proton's launch

It's been an exciting twelve months here at CodeWeavers. One year ago, Valve publicly announced and launched the product we had been developing together privately for over two years. This is Proton, an enhancement to their Steam Play initiative. Proton's slot in Steam Play is to allow Linux gamers to play Windows-exclusive games, using the Wine technology that we've spent decades developing. Proton's launch day was exciting. The launch window that Valve set was after our Minnesota-based office closed, but we stayed after hours. We spun up a chat room with our contacts at Valve, ordered some pizzas to the office for dinner, loaded up all sorts of Steam-related news sites, web forums, and chat rooms, and waited for Valve to push the button. We…

Who Do You Think You Are!?!?!?!?

1 August 2019
by James RameyJames Ramey
CodeWeavers is going through a re-branding process right now.  I should clarify.  Our Director of Marketing, Ms. Jana Schmid, is going through a re-branding of our company – I’m just riding ‘shotgun’ to her efforts.  Actually I’m not even riding ‘shotgun’, I’m just being a pointy-haired executive adding my tidbits into the conversations as that’s what pointy-haired executives tend to do.  And while my MBA is in Marketing with emphasis on brand strategy, I was mentally prepared to defer these conversations to the *experts* who LIVE this experience 24/7. But sitting back got me thinking and made me realize that I LIVE this brand.  If much of re-branding is about defining who you are as a company, then I am this…

How Proton helped improve Wine 4.2

27 March 2019  
by Andrew EikumAndrew Eikum
On Tuesday (March 26, 2019), Valve released Proton 4.2, a new update to their Steam Play compatibility layer based on Wine 4.2. The previous major version of Proton was based on Wine 3.16. As with CodeWeavers's own projects, the strong preference for work going into Proton is to also get the changes into upstream Wine. There are many benefits to this. First, all Wine users will benefit from these fixes, whether they are end users of Wine itself, CrossOver users, or users of any other Wine fork. There are also benefits for the maintainers of Proton. For example, upstreaming patches helps prevent regressions, thanks to Wine's extensive test suite; it lowers the maintenance burden, as there are fewer changes to move between Wine versions; it…

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